Chapter 6: The Verbunkos Idiom in the Music of the Future

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Contents

Example 6.1 | Example 6.2 | Example 6.3 | Example 6.4 | Example 6.5 | Example 6.6 | Example 6.7 | Example 6.8 | Example 6.9 | Example 6.10 | Example 6.11 | Example 6.12 | Example 6.13 | Example 6.14 | Example 6.15 | Example 6.16 | Example 6.17 | Example 6.18 | Example 6.19 | Example 6.20 | Example 6.21 | Example 6.22 | Example 6.23

Example 6.1

Präludium und Fuge über den Namen B–A–C–H (1855 version), mm. 1–8

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Example 6.2

“La Notte,” mm. 55–62. The text indicating the verbunkos cadence is my addition.

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Example 6.3

Example 6.3. From Beethoven’s Piano Sonata in A Major, Op. 26, Marcia funebre (third
movement): select bars represent the main harmonic progression of the first period (mm.
1–20)

mm. 1-2
mm. 8-9
mm. 16-17

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Example 6.4

Example 6.4. Harmonic reduction of “Il penseroso,” mm. 1–22 (main frame). Specific events
are quoted in full in the outer frames.

Harmonic reduction (middle frame)
mm. 1-2
m. 10
mm. 17-19
mm. 21-22

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Example 6.5

“La Notte”: (a) mm. 98–105, phrase repeats and a few details from the piano
score omitted; followed by (b) mm. 106–11, quoted in full

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Example 6.6

“La Notte,” mm. 150–54

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Example 6.7

Example 6.7. “La Notte”: common tones between G and F major in mm. 150–51

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Example 6.8

Missa solemnis, Credo, opening bars (reduction)

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Example 6.9

Harmonic progression in the Missa solemnis, Credo, mm. 113–70

 

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Example 6.10

Missa solemnis, Kyrie, mm. 1–8 (reduction)

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Example 6.11

Missa solemnis, Kyrie, mm. 25–36 (orchestration and phrase repetitions reduced)
and harmonic progression in mm. 37–50

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Example 6.12

(a) Chopin, Scherzo No. 1, Op. 20, mm. 9–16;
(b) Liszt, Scherzo und Marsch, mm. 1–8

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Example 6.13

“Terror” motive from the Scherzo und Marsch:

(a) m. 44;
(b) m. 77, repeated in m. 83

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Example 6.14

Totentanz, mm. 1–6 (reduction)

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Example 6.15

Totentanz, beginning of fifth variation, mm. 183–92

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Example 6.16

Totentanz,
beginning of first variation, mm.51–55 (reduction)

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Example 6.17

Totentanz, mm.41–50

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Example 6.18

Totentanz, mm. 325–40 (reduction; repeat in mm. 337–40 omitted)

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Example 6.19

(a)Totentanz, part of the cadenza at m. 590. The basic chord and scale of each of the two phrases is represented in
(b) and
(c) respectively

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Example 6.20

Mephisto Waltz No. 1: rhythmic pattern and hypermeter in the opening bars

 

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Example 6.21

Mephisto Waltz No. 1, main themes:

(a) Mephisto theme;
(b) amoroso theme,
comprising of four phrases (m. 339ff; given in simplified rhythm an texture);
(c) scherzando
theme

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Example 6.22

Mephisto Waltz No. 1, mm. 644–904 (harmonic reduction of final part)

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Example 6.23

Mephisto Waltz No. 1, kalindra in mm. 887–904

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